College advice from NH students

We asked New Hampshire students just like you a few questions about their transition after high school

Nate Obin
Plymouth State University
Major: College Leadership

How did you decide what you wanted to do after high school?

I knew that I wanted to get a college degree so I decided to look at colleges and universities. On my first tour to Plymouth State University I knew this where I wanted to be for the next four years of my life. I applied to four different schools and got into all of them, so I chose the one with the best financial aid package. In my case, my first and favorite choice was Plymouth State University.

What is the best thing about life after high school?

Having the ability to be who I wanted to be in college, but to also have the freedom of being an adult. I like the fact that if I want to stay up until 3 in the morning eating pizza with my friends I had that choice.

Who/what helped you through the transition?

What really helped me through the transition from high school to college life was the orientation program at Plymouth State. You have an orientation in June when you either have just graduated high school or you are about to graduate. Then when you move into the dorms in August there is a three-day transition period to get accustomed to the campus and to meet your new roommate and friends.

What do you wish someone would have told you before you graduated?

I wish that someone told me that I could have been whatever I want to be before I graduated. Instead I was told that I should major in a “useful major” to best find a job after college. I find that I do better in classes with subjects that actually interest me rather than classes other people say I should take.

How was the application process? What/who helped you the most?

The application process was not too troubling. The thing I stressed out about the most was the essay portion. I worried about what do I write about, is everything prefect and does this portray who I really am? Those were the questions that haunted me the most. Most admissions offices would like to see a few grammar and spelling mistakes than not getting the chance to read who you really are. Who helped me the most was the Keene State College Upward Bound. This program not only paid for all of my college applications, but also the entire college experience, from filling out the applications to finishing my FAFSA (Free Application for Student Aid).

Anything you weren't prepared for?

I was not prepared for how hard it was going to be to balance my social life, class, homework, work and extracurriculars. Time management plays a big role in a college student’s life and it is something that you need to master. When it comes down to having a few hours off, do I do that assignment or do I go hang out with my friends? Managing my time was something I was not prepared for.

What are you doing today?

This fall I will be entering my junior year at Plymouth State University. I have decided to make my own major, called College Leadership, through Plymouth’s Interdisciplinary program so that I can become a Dean of Students someday. Since my time at Plymouth State I have become an Orientation Leader for the incoming first-year students. I have served on the Student Senate for the past two years and as an admissions representative as well. Another project that I am working on is trying to get an Upward Bound program at Plymouth State University. Through all of my college experience as a student in Plymouth I found that Administration is really there for the students so that is what I want to do for the rest of my life.

Erin Bryant
Saint Anselm College
Major: Biology 

How did you decide what you wanted to do after high school?

I’ve always been interested in science and animals, so I was always sort of leaning toward becoming a veterinarian. When I was a senior in high school, I interned at an animal hospital through an internship program at school. I was able to observe surgeries being performed and other veterinary procedures that fascinated me and solidified my resolve to become a veterinarian.

What is the best thing about life after high school?

After high school, I gained a lot more independence than I had in high school while living at home. This comes with responsibilities, but the results of upholding these responsibilities and your experiences are rewarding and can lead you in the direction you want your life to take.

Who/what helped you through the transition?

My new friends I made in college were a huge part of transitioning to college. Your friends at school become your family; you eat with them and spend much of your free time with them, so they help to lessen the pain of homesickness and help you develop the skills to live on your own.

What do you wish someone would have told you before you graduated?

There wasn’t very much I didn’t know about college before I went; my brother went to college before me and I had some older friends that related their college experiences to me.

How was the application process? What/who helped you the most?

The application process was time-consuming but not difficult. My family and my teachers and guidance counselors helped me the most.

Anything you weren't prepared for?

I don’t think I was quite prepared for the workload of the classes at my school. I knew that they would require studying and effort, but the weeks right before finals in every semester are very crazy for everyone because projects, big papers, etc. are all due during this time. Time management skills are essential during the semester to avoid a massive pileup of work and sleepless nights during the end of the semester.

What are you doing today?

This year is my last year at Saint Anselm College and I am currently applying to schools for veterinary medicine. I also work part-time at an animal hospital.

Categories: Advice